Premiere Mortgage Services Inc. - Dana Bain

Frequently Asked Questions CFPBs TILA RESPA Integrated Disclosure TRID Rule

October 19th, 2015 8:23 PM by Dana Bain

September 9, 2015 Page 1
Frequently Asked Questions
CFPB’s TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure (TRID) Rule
To use the index, click on a topic below to be taken to that topic location in the document.
Section 1: General Questions Section 2: Exempt Transactions Section 3: Loan Estimate (LE) Section 4: 3-Day Review Period Section 5: Closing Disclosure (CD)
Section 6: Communicating with Creditors Section 7: Owner’s Title Insurance Premium Section 8: Seller
Section 9: Simultaneous Issue Section 10: APR
Section 11: Day of Consummation Section 12: Post-Closing
Section 13: Industry Issues
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 2
Frequently Asked Questions
CFPB’s TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure (TRID) Rule
Old Republic Title offers customized PowerPoint presentations for our agents so that you can “Show What You Know” to your lender and real estate agent clients. We have information, guidance and materials available for you to be a knowledgeable resource for your customers. The following are what we have found to be commonly asked questions from “Show What You Know” and other TRID training to help you prepare for TRID implementation.
Note: The terms creditor and lender are used interchangeably in this document.
Section 1: General Questions
Do the provisions of the new Rule apply to private lenders?
The answer is yes and no.
There are two new Rules private investors must understand; first is the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure (TRID) Rule and second is the Loan Originator (LO) Act.
The TRID Rule has an exemption for any lender making five or fewer loans per year. As an example, if it is a simple seller take-back or a parent/child transaction the TRID Rule will not apply; however, the LO Act may make this type of loan difficult to make. The LO Act can be found at http://www.consumerfinance.gov/regulations/loan-originator-compensation- requirements-under-the-truth-in-lending-act-regulation-z/.
Is it likely that the form will have revisions before implementation?
The main issue that remains is the way we are directed to disclose the title premiums. This required calculation renders the CD inaccurate in 21 states where the seller pays the Owner’s Title Policy premium. And in most other states where premiums are filed, published or promulgated, the disclosure requirement may violate state insurance rules or codes. It does not seem likely that the CFPB will correct the issue anytime soon.
Are lenders allowed to use the form prior to October 3, 2015?
Lenders are not permitted to supply this form to consumers prior to implementation, which is with loan applications taken on or after October 3, 2015. We should start teaching our staff about the form now so that they can become educated and in turn we should start educating our business partners.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 3
Do the provisions of the Rule apply to secondmortgages?
Yes. There is actually an example of a form in the Rule showing that the proceeds from the second mortgage are brought over to Section L of the Closing Disclosure (CD) for the first mortgage.
Does the Rule apply to five-year residential loans?
The provisions of the Rule apply to most closed-end residential mortgages. Within the Rule there is a discussion as to why the CFPB decided to include two-year temporary construction loans so depending on the type of loan to which you are referring, the Rule may apply.
Does the form and related requirements apply to second homes and investment properties with 1-4 family units?
Yes it does if the property is deemed “residential” by the lender.
Service Provider Lists
If the creditor/lender requires a service only because it was mentioned in the Contract for Sale, does it trigger the creditor/lender’s need to supply a list of service providers for that service?
CFPB’s verbal response was, “yes.” If the creditor/lender includes the requirement on their commitment, then it is deemed a loan requirement and the lender must comply with providing a list of service providers for that service. We asked, “what if the creditor/lender includes a simple requirement that the consumer must meet all of the requirements of the Contract of Sale but does not mention any specific services?” The CFPB representative said, “Nice try.” He went on to explain that it doesn’t matter how the creditor/lender learned about the service requirements or how it’s worded on the commitment, they must comply with the additional provisions of the Rule if their loan is conditioned on meeting the requirement.
Example: If the Contract of Sale requires the consumer to purchase a home inspection and then the creditor/lender mentions it directly or indirectly in the loan commitment, the creditor/lender must supply a provider list of home inspector(s).
Section 2: EXEMPT TRANSACTIONS
What types of transactions are exempt from the requirements of the newRule?
HELOC, reverse mortgages, loans made by creditors making five or fewer loans per year (but they still have to deal with the Loan Originator (LO) Act), cash, commercial purpose loans, mobile home loans and no-interest second mortgages made for down payment assistance, and
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 4
energy efficiency or foreclosure avoidance are all exempt. Most every other residential 1-4 family dwelling closed-end mortgage falls within the scope of the Rule.
I have a client who makes several purchase-money loans each year to investors who purchase residential properties for repair/improvement and resale. Will the client’s lending activities fall under the Rule?
The Rule specifically exempts lenders who make fewer than five loans per year; however, your client will fall under the onerous Loan Originator Rule if the loans are for residentialpurposes.
The Loan Originator Rule can be found at http://www.consumerfinance.gov/regulations/loan- originator-compensation-requirements-under-the-truth-in-lending-act-regulation-z/.
How will the Rule affect commercial transactions? Under the Rule, will we be required to have two separate and distinct sets of forms between commercial transactions and residential transactions?
Commercial transactions do NOT fall under the provisions of the Rule. The form used for commercial transactions will most likely be dictated by the lender; however, check with your software provider to make certain that the current-HUD-1 and the ALTA Settlement Sheet will be on your system for your use with exempt transactions.
A lender asks if an investor (under a company name) who buys and sells houses is subject to follow the Rule. The investor finances the purchases with a bank loan, rehabilitates the residential property and then sells the property. Would this be considered commercial as long as the investor would not be living in the property as a residence but simply buys and sells it? In this scenario it would be considered commercial and exempt from the Rule, correct?
We should not opine on whether a property is considered commercial or residential. The definition of commercial follows other banking rules; the creditor will make that decision as to whether the transaction is exempt or not. There are different standards when it comes to multi-family dwellings as compared to single family homes and the investor should ask the lender’s compliance department to be certain. Please also do not forget about the Loan Originator Act when it comes to individual lenders.
If a creditor/lender on a commercial transaction requires a mortgage on one of the parties’ residences, does that mortgage fall under the provisions and requirements of TRID?
This was verbally answered by a CFPB attorney who said that as long as the “primary” purpose of the mortgage on the residential property is NOT for “personal, family or household purposes,” it does not fall under the provisions of TRID.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 5
Are transactions involving loans of 25 acres or more, construction-only loans and vacant land loans covered by TRID?
Yes. While these loans are currently exempt from mortgage disclosure requirements under RESPA and Regulation X, the TRID Rule includes them depending on the primary purpose of the loan. The loan is included as a “consumer credit transaction” if the money, property or services is used primarily for personal, family or household purposes and the debt is secured by a
closed-end transaction secured by real property.
The CFPB believes that covering all real estate-secured closed-end consumer credit transactions (other than reverse mortgages) would eliminate the guess work for lenders as to which loans are covered and which loans are exempt while providing consumers with the best information available to make their decisions.
Section 3: LOAN ESTIMATE (LE)
Does this replace the Truth in Lending (TIL) Disclosures?
For covered transactions, yes. There is a Part A to the new form called the Loan Estimate (LE) that replaces the early TIL and the Good Faith Estimate (GFE). Part B, the Closing Disclosure (CD) replaces the final TIL and the HUD-1
May lenders charge for pre-approvals and when is the application fee charged?
The lender may not charge anything at the time of loan application except a reasonable credit report fee. The lender may not delay the delivery of the LE once the six elements that define an application are received. After delivery of the LE and after the consumer gives an indication that he/she wants to proceed with the loan, the lender may charge additional fees.
The Rule states: “Limitation on fees. Consistent with current law, the creditor generally cannot charge consumers any fees until after the consumers have been given the Loan Estimate form and the consumers have communicated their intent to proceed with the transaction. There is an exception that allows creditors to charge fees to obtain consumers’ credit reports.” This provision is in § 1026.19(e)(2)(i).
A lender asks would it be possible to have an explanation for the “last day the creditor may revise Loan Estimate (LE) from contract info?”
The creditor must ensure that the consumer receives the revised LE no later than four business days prior to consummation. If the creditor is mailing the LE and relying upon the “mailbox
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 6
rule,” the creditor would need to place the LE in the mail no later than seven business days before consummation of the transaction to allow three business days for receipt. § 1026.19(e)4 If there are fewer than four business days in between the time the revised LE would have been required to be provided to the consumer and consummation, creditors may provide consumers with a Closing Disclosure (CD) reflecting any revised charges resulting from the changed circumstance and rely on those figures (rather than the amounts disclosed on the LE) for purposes of determining good faith and the applicable tolerance. (Comment from19(e)(4)(ii)-1)
What are the six elements that trigger a loan application has been received and then requires the lender issue the Loan Estimate (LE) within three businessdays?
Address of Property Loan amount sought Income
Estimated Value Name
Social Security Number
Since Washington DC likes acronyms so much, you can easily remember the six elements by its acronym = A.L.I.E.N.S.
Section 4: 3-DAY REVIEW PERIOD
After reading more on the Closing Disclosure (CD): Does the three-day time period also apply to the closing documents from the lender or is it just the Closing Disclosure (CD)? If the closing is mailed away, we usually need the package ready several days before closing. Will the three-day time period apply three days before we need the package to send out or is it still three days before closing?
The CD is the disclosure document required to be delivered prior to closing not the entire closing package. Therefore you are going to have to do what you are likely doing now: stay in close communication with the lender in order to get everything you need when you need it.
What determines whether the Closing Disclosure (CD) form was delivered three days in advance?
The lender is responsible for the delivery of the CD but the Rule allows the lender to designate another party to handle the delivery. Because the requirement is so strictly defined and the penalties so severe, it is believed that most lenders will make the delivery and not allow another party to deliver. We, as the closing industry, are not responsible to “police” the delivery but need to be cautious if we hear something contrary to the Rule. With regard to the specifics of calculating the three day advance disclosure requirement, the mailing rule and the definition of
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 7
business day come into play. If the CD is not hand-delivered (or delivered in a manner that affirmatively confirms delivery to the consumer) then an additional three days are added to the time period. This is the case even if the document is sent electronically (and for all practical purposes is almost always transferred to the recipient’s inbox instantaneously). The definition of a “business day” as it applies to the delivery of the CD differs from the definition used for the delivery of the Loan Estimate (LE). A business day for CD purposes is all calendar days other than Sundays and the 10 federal holidays. Therefore, Sundays and the 10 federal holidays must be removed from the count. If you do not hand deliver the CD, the time period will most typically expand to seven days in advance of closing (three days in transit, three days for review plus one Sunday or federal holiday when applicable).
Does the borrower receive the Closing Disclosure (CD) three days in advance or at closing?
The borrower (now called the Consumer) MUST receive the final CD at least three business days in advance of closing or we may not close. The lender is responsible and liable for the delivery but we will need to supply our fees, adjustments and invoices to the lender well in advance if the lender is going to input the numbers. We need to create processes within our operations to supply the numbers at least seven days in advance so that the lender may complete the form and meet the delivery requirement. See prior answer for more on this issue.
I thought that the whole process was that NOTHING changed after the delivery of the Closing Disclosure (CD).
You are thinking of the original proposal by the CFPB in the draft of the Rule. Because of the American Land Title Association’s (ALTA) massive effort (along with the help of a number of our related industry professionals) to convince the CFPB that delaying closing for minor changes would cause chaos and harm both buyer and seller, the final Rule states that under only three circumstances will the three-day review period be re-triggered.
Does the three-day review period retrigger mean that the loan has to be re- approved? What are the three changes that would cause a re-triggering of the three-day review period?
It is possible since the three triggers for re-disclosure and a new three-day waiting period are major occurrences the loan will have to go back to underwriting. The three instances where a new review period is required are:
1) If a pre-payment penalty is added,
2) If the loan product changes, or
3) If the APR increases beyond the allowable limit.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 8
Do the regulations in the Rule affect the three-day right of rescission on refinances or do the borrowers get three days prior to signing plus three days after?
The three-day right of rescission does not change with the new Rule. Therefore the consumer will have three days prior to consummation to review the fees, terms and charges and three days after consummation to reconsider the entire loan offering.
If a consumer writes a statement specifically waiving their right to the three-day review is there a provision to allow for this?
There is a provision in the Rule stating that the borrower can waive the three-day waiting period after they receive the Closing Disclosure (CD) or the revised CD ONLY if the borrower has a Bona Fide Personal Financial Emergency. The phrase is undefined but they give one example, “[t]he imminent sale of the consumer’s home at foreclosure, where the foreclosure sale will proceed unless loan proceeds are made available to the consumer during the waiting period, is one example of a bona fide personal financial emergency.” This is a very high bar to set and within the Rule the CFPB is concerned about expanding the use of waivers fearing that any expansion will lead to abuse. This waiver request must be in writing and must provide details for the basis of the request. It will be up to the lender to determine if a waiver will be permitted. A borrower may not waive the review period on behalf of the seller.
Someone read that it is up to the lender whether or not they would need to re- disclose the Closing Disclosure (CD).
The need to re-disclose and the retriggering of the three-day review period depend on the reason for which the credit/adjustment is required. If it is a credit that MAY affect the value or a credit on which the appraiser must opine then the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) may be triggered which requires the delivery of the final appraisal to the consumer three business days prior to consummation. Therefore, if the appraisal must be rewritten and re-delivered we MAY have to give the consumer three days to review the revised appraisal. Many small items affect the appraised value and it is in those circumstances where the creditor may need to stop the closing.
How do I handle the situation if the consumer states that they never received the Closing Disclosure (CD)?
Simply call the lender and tell them the consumer states that they did not receive the CD in advance and then inquire if the lender would like you to proceed. Remember, if the lender used the “mail-box method” of delivery (either mailing or emailing the CD seven days in advance); there is a presumption in the Rule that the consumer received the CD without requiring proof of receipt. Therefore, it is entirely possible that the lender met its obligation but the CD got lost in the mail/email.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
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Section 5: CLOSING DISCLOSURE (CD)
There are challenges with the real property taxes on the Closing Disclosure (CD). It seems clear if the lender requires the current year’s taxes be paid in advance yet the taxes are not yet due from the seller in a sale transaction, the taxes are reflected in Section F (Prepaids). If it is a property tax lien recorded against the property for back taxes owed by the seller, it is reflected in Section N (due from seller at closing).
On a refinance transaction, what if the borrower needs to pay the current year’s property taxes, back taxes or a tax lien? Would they appear in Section F (Prepaids) or in Section H (Other)?
The easiest answer is the individual creditor may dictate how they want it shown on the CD but in absence of that, here is an example of how you may choose to show these fees:
Section F: The Rule specifically states that the “Prepaids” Section is for prepaid items to be paid by the consumer in advance of the first loan payment. Since the Rule states that this section is for items owed by the consumer then it would seem that seller-pay items do not belong in this section (even though the seller’s column runs through it). §1026.38(g)(2)
Section H is for costs incurred by the consumer or seller not required to be disclosed on the Loan Estimate (LE) (other than the Owner’s Title Insurance premium) or not required to be paid by the creditor. §1026.38(g)(4) One could argue that the creditor DOES require the outstanding taxes be paid but in reality, WE require that they are paid to protect the lien position of the loan. Section H seems an appropriate place if they are being paid by the seller.
Section N, lines 1-13 are reserved for payment of liened items.
Will the 10% tolerance levels be a part of the newRule?
Both the zero tolerance and 10% tolerance buckets will remain in effect under the new Rule; however, the zero tolerance bucket has expanded. Now added to the zero tolerance bucket items are fees paid to any affiliates of the lender. As an example, if the lender owns 25% or more of the title company used then the title fees fall into the zero tolerance bucket, meaning the fees charged at closing must equal exactly what was estimated on the last Loan Estimate (LE). As an aside, the new Rule now refers to tolerances as “variances.”
Where will we show payments to construction subcontractors on the Closing Disclosure (CD)? What if there aren’t enough lines?
Section H, “Other,” should be used to pay for items that have nothing to do with the loan and if there isn’t enough room on the form, the Rule specifically allows for additional lines to be added up to a certain number per section. In addition, if there still isn’t enough room, the Rule allows for addendums as long as formatting requirements are followed.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 10
Will we still use the HUD-1 along with the Closing Disclosure (CD)?
The HUD-1 may NOT be used on any of the covered loans; however, you will want your software provider to leave the current HUD-1 and have them add the ALTA Settlement Sheet on your system for use in transactions involving HELOCs, reverse mortgage, cash, commercial and any other exempt transactions and for any covered transactions opened prior to the implementation date of October 3, 2015.
Who prepares the form?
The Rule grants the creditor the option of preparing the Closing Disclosure (CD) or using a third party for this task. Each creditor will make the decision as to whether they will prepare the CD internally or they will allow an outside entity to prepare the form. The lender will prepare the Loan Estimate (LE).
Can we overwrite the dollar amount where the recording fees are to add other fees such as recording of Municipal Lien certificate or discharge ofmortgage?
The Rule allows us to itemize transfer fees in Section E but not recording fees other than the deed and mortgage. We are directed to lump all “other” recording fees together and include in the total with the total for the deed and mortgage. However, the ALTA Settlement Statement will allow for itemization of each recorded document as well as the accurate calculation disclosure of the title fees.
Where on the Closing Disclosure (CD) would you list leasehold transfer fees?
If the fees are due to a government authority they will go on lines in Section E on Page 2 of the CD. Even though the forms show only a few available lines, the Rule allows us to add lines to this section to accommodate the itemization of all transfer fees. The “payee” listed on the CD must be the name of the authority who assessed the fee and not a service company who performs e-recordings (if applicable).
Where on the Closing Disclosure (CD) do we put the seller’s mortgage payoffs?
According to the Rule, any payoffs for seller liened items appear in Section N (on Page 3 of the combined CD and on Page 1 of the seller-only form). This is only for items that are liened at the time of consummation and not for items that may become liened at a later date.
Where should premium taxes be listed on the Closing Disclosure (CD)?
Care must be taken in determining the placement of governmental premium taxes on the CD. At first blush it would seem that a governmental fee such as a premium tax would be placed in “Section E: Taxes and Governmental Fees” on the CD. However, in accordance with the Rule, only taxes/fees that are based on either the sale price or the mortgage amount and considered Transfer Taxes may be listed in Section E (along with recording fees).
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 11
Page 1798: § 1026.37(g)(1) through (3). “3. Transfer taxes – terminology. In general, transfer taxes listed under § 1026.37(g)(1) are State and local government fees on mortgages and home sales that are based on the loan amount or sales price, while recording fees are State and local government fees for recording the loan and title documents.”
If the premium tax is based on the title premium, it does not seem to fit with the allowable fees in Section E. The state of Kentucky, as an example, has a Municipal Premium Tax based on a percentage of the title premium. “The premium tax is a pass through tax. The tax must be charged to the purchaser of the title insurance policy and added to the regular premium for that policy.” OR bulletin dated 7/1/2015.
Based on this information in the Rule, it leaves Sections B or C (depending on the circumstances) for the collection and disclosure of the premium tax attributable to the Loan Title Policy premium and Section H for the collection of the premium tax attributable to the Owner’s Title Policy premium.
Please seek guidance from your lender regarding their determination for the placement of the premium taxes as defined above and if they are unsure you are welcome to share section
§1026.3.7(g)(1) – (3) with them on page 1798 of the TRID Rule.
How are last-minute changes made to the seller’s side of the Closing Disclosure (CD) that do not affect the buyer’s numbers?
It depends. If the creditor/lender is inputting the numbers onto the CD and uses the combined buyer-seller form, you will need to ask them to make any and all changes or get permission from them to make changes. Most lenders have indicated that they will be delivering only the borrower’s side of the CD and will rely solely on the closing/escrow industry to provide the seller’s CD. The Rule specifically tasked the closing/settlement industry with the responsibility of preparing and delivering the seller’s side. If the lender is inputting the numbers and uses the buyer-only form, this will allow you to create and use the seller-only form, leaving you the opportunity to make the changes instantaneously. However, most lenders will require you to obtain their authorization prior to making any changes to the seller’s side of the CD. Be sure to talk to your lender(s) about this. If we prepare and deliver the seller-only CD, we are required to supply the lender with a copy of the seller-only form. There is no delivery requirement regarding the seller’s portion of the CD or the seller-only form prior to consummation. The TRID Rule states that the delivery of the seller’s side must be made at the time of consummation.
Sometimes the closing fee is reduced at the time of settlement. Will this create a problem under the TRID Rule?
The reduction of fees under the TRID Rule creates two issues. First, if the fee is included in either the zero tolerance bucket or the 10% tolerance bucket, a reduction does not cause a tolerance. However, it the lender is inputting the numbers onto the CD the logistics of physically accomplishing the change remains the challenge. You will have to call the lender, make the request and wait for the revised CD to be created and delivered to you.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
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Are title endorsements placed on separate lines on Page 2 in Section C or do they roll-up to Lender’s Title Insurance?
If the Endorsements are for the loan policy, the loan title fees will appear in either Section B or C depending on the circumstances*; however, roll-ups are not used on the Closing Disclosure, only itemization. Therefore, endorsements will each appear on separate lines and will be listed starting with “Title -” and then a description of the endorsement. Remember, all fees will be shown in each section in alphabetical order.
*Loan title fees will be shown in Section B if the consumer is given the option to shop for title and they choose a title provider that is on the lender’s “Provider List” or if the provider is an affiliate (under the definition of affiliate) of the lender or mortgage broker. Loan title fees will appear in Section C if the consumer is permitted to shop and the chosen provider is not listed on the lender provider list (or is not an affiliate of the lender or mortgage broker).
Is it a requirement that the closing/settlement fee is itemized or can it continue to be shown by the roll-up method?
Roll-ups will no longer be permitted. Each individual fee must be itemized in the appropriate section in alphabetical order and begin with “Title –” and then the fee name.
Where do the document stamps, etc. appear on the new Closing Disclosure (CD)?
All government fees will be itemized in Section E on Page 2 of the CD. The jurisdiction collecting the fee should be listed not the payee if it is different. This is recognition that many use e-recording services and write the actual check to the e-recording company instead of to the county clerks. Section E does not have many lines but the Rule allows for the addition of lines when necessary and for the removal any unused lines (except line A01).
Where are the buyer's and seller's signature lines on the Closing Disclosure (CD)?
The Rule does not require signature lines from either the buyer or the seller; however, if the lender requires a confirmation, the signature line must contain the promulgated wording. Many software providers are considering adding an additional page, but if the escrow or closing company uses the ALTA Settlement Statement in addition to the CD, signature lines are provided on the ALTA Settlement Statement with authorization language to proceed.
Is it true that the closing/settlement provider may not give a copy of the Closing Disclosure (CD) to real estate agents?
Since the CD is considered a loan document, that determination is up to the lender. Most lenders have stated that they will give a copy of the completed CD to the closing entity and the borrower and if the borrower wants their real estate agent, attorney, or CPA to have it, then the borrower will have to supply it.
Because the CD contains a great deal of NPPI (Non-Public Personal Information), we should be
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
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cautious and follow the lender’s instructions. On June 9, 2015, Bank of America answered a similar question by saying “Bank of America will distribute the buyer/borrower's Closing Disclosure to the borrower(s), while the settlement agent is responsible for preparing and delivering the seller's Closing Disclosure. The settlement agent should continue the practice of providing the Closing Disclosure to the Real Estate Agent(s) involved in the transaction, as applicable.” Since Bank of America indicates the settlement agent is responsible for the seller’s CD it leads us to believe that their comment about sharing the CD with the real estate agents is referring to the seller’s CD only. But we do not know for certain.
On July 9, 2015 Bank of America advised “providers” that they should follow “state or local laws as well as any applicable provisions of the sales contract when determining how/if to share the borrower’s and/or seller’s” CD. But what if the letter of instructions from the lender contains prohibitive language? Publically, Wells Fargo has said we may NOT give a copy of this loan form to the third parties involved in the transaction.
Recognizing this issue and many other issues created by the provisions of the Rule, ALTA created a shareable closing form called the ALTA Settlement Statement (ALTA SS). When ALTA talked about the benefits of using the ALTA SS in conjunction with the CD it said, “It is a form that can be shared with the interested parties (REALTORS®, Attorneys, CPAs, etc) as the CD is a loan form and the majority of lenders will not permit its distribution to anyone except the borrowers.” Perhaps the answer is to utilize the ALTA SS (in a bifurcated format) so that you have a form that can be shared with all parties.
On Page 5 of the Closing Disclosure there is a box entitled “Contact Information.” Who should be listed in the Real Estate Broker and Settlement Agent sections and what License ID’s should be used?
The CFPB’s goal for requiring the listing of contact information is so that the consumer has easy access to the appropriate parties with any questions they might have at the time of receipt and post-closing.
The columns labeled “Real Estate Broker (B)” (buyer) and “Real Estate Broker (S)” (seller) should contain the name and address of the brokerage house along with the state license number for the firm. If only one Real Estate Broker is involved in the transaction, the non- applicable column may be deleted. The form also requires the listing of the individual or “Contact” with whom the consumer has the most interaction, normally the individual real estate agent. The real estate agent’s state license number must also be listed along with an email address and phone number.
License number is defined in the Rule on Page 1871 as “5. License number or unique identifier. Section 1026.38(r)(3) and (5) requires the disclosure of a license number or unique identifier for each person (including natural persons) identified in the table who does not have a NMLSR ID if the applicable State, locality, or other regulatory body with responsibility for licensing and/or registering such person’s business activities has issued a license number or other unique identifier to such person under § 1026.38(r)(3) and (5). The space in the table is left blank for
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 14
the disclosures in the columns corresponding to persons who are not subject to the issuance of such a license number or unique identifier to be disclosed under § 1026.38(r)(3) and (5); provided that, the creditor or settlement agent may omit the column from the table or, if necessary, replace the column with the contact information for an additional person.”
The Settlement Agent’s column follows the same set of rules. The company name, address and state license number (if applicable) is entered first and then the “Contact” should be the person the consumer can contact with questions about the transaction. The contact’s state license number (if applicable), email address and phone number must also be listed.
For attorneys who perform closing services, the Rule mentions on Page 1872 that “if the closing attorney employed by the settlement agent disclosed under § 1026.38(r)(1) has a State-issued settlement agent license number, but the consumer meets with the attorney’s assistant to fill out any necessary documentation prior to the closing and to answer questions, the closing attorney’s name is disclosed under § 1026.38(r)(4) because the assistant is only performing clerical functions.”
Section 6: COMMUNICATING WITH CREDITORS
Some title agents in our area provide a preliminary HUD-1 to their clients showing the lender's and the title agent’s estimated fees. This preliminary HUD-1 can be provided to the buyer and seller up to two weeks prior to closing. The final HUD-1 is provided 24 hours prior to closing. Do you see this practice continuing with the new Rule?
The problem with doing a preliminary Closing Disclosure (CD) in the future is that you will not know which box to put the fees in unless you know whether or not your company is listed on the provider list given to the consumer by the creditor. If your company is on the provider list, then your loan policy fees will go in Box B (of the CD) but if you are not on provider list, the loan policy fees will go in Box C. You may want to consider sending your charges on a form other than a preliminary CD, such as the ALTA Settlement Statement.
In addition, the CD contains Non-Public Personal Information (NPPI) and chances are you will not be permitted by the lender to give the CD to anyone except the borrower. You may want to consider using the ALTA Settlement Statement in addition to the CD.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 15
Section 7: OWNER’S TITLE INSURANCE PREMIUM
Owner’s Title Insurance Modifier: If the borrower elects not to have Owner’s Title Insurance, we are able to proceed [in our state] since there is a mortgagee policy being issued. In this instance, would we charge full premium for the loan policy? Also, why would the borrower elect not to have a policy that the seller pays for (in many areas) and the seller would then have to provide additional money out-of- pocket at closing since the loan policy will not be simultaneously issued?
The good news is the Rule specifically allows IF THE SELLER is paying for the owner’s portion of the premium then the modifier “optional” does not need to be included. This should allow you to avoid the conversation all together, even though you could easily opine on the benefits of owner’s protection.
Why is the owner’s policy listed in the “Other” Section (Section H)?
That portion of the title premium attributable to the owner’s policy (per the required calculation method) must be listed in Section H and the modifier “optional” must be on the same line IF the consumer/borrower is paying for any portion of the owner’s policy. If the seller is paying for the owner’s portion of the title premium, the word “optional” as a modifier is not required. This is the only place that the calculated owner’s premium may appear unless Owner’s Title Insurance is required by the lender in which case the fee will be disclosed in either section B or C depending on the circumstances.
If Owner's Title Premium is listed on the Closing Disclosure (CD) as "optional" will this eliminate the need to have buyers sign the more detailed "Notice of Availability of Owner's Title?"
The Rule does not address these notices, but the use of the word “optional” makes it more likely that Notices of Availability of Owner’s Title will continue in jurisdictions which now require its use and expand to those that currently do not use such notices. One hopes that no purchaser ever waives the owner’s title protection. The title industry is making a concerted effort to better educate the consumer and others on the value of title insurance, which will hopefully be effective in diminishing the instances where a consumer elects not to obtain Owner’s Title Insurance.
Perhaps there should be a caveat with respect to Owner's Title Insurance - optional "at your own risk."
On the sample Closing Disclosure (CD) in the Rule, there is a “rebate” shown on Page 3 of the CD. Is that an attempt to correct the incorrect title fee calculation? If not, what is it?
No, it is not an attempt to correct the inaccurate way the CFPB requires title insurance premiums to be calculated. The CFPB has not confirmed the reason a rebate is shown in the
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 16
sample CD, although it could be a way for the CFPB to illustrate the Butler Rebate in Florida. Florida allows the consumer to negotiate the agent’s portion of the title premium and if there is a “rebate,” it may be shown as a rebate on the CD.
Attempts to correct the inaccurate calculation of the title premium on the CD must be carefully worded. Make the correction by crediting and debiting the appropriate parties on Page 3. Using words such as “adjustment” or “credit” may trigger a Qualified Mortgage (QM) issue with the loan. Lenders will decide how the correction should be labeled; therefore, discussing it with them now will help everyone be prepared for implementation and for use on the CD.
Is the charge for an Owner’s Title Insurance Policy from an affiliated provider subject to tolerance category?
The Rule contains conflicting information; first, the misleading part of the Rule is found in the preamble at pages 364-365 which states: “With respect to the question whether proposed § 1026.19(e)(3)(iii) would have included fees paid to lender affiliates for an optional settlement service, charges for third-party services not required by the creditor (other than owner’s title insurance) are not subject to a tolerance category, even if a lender affiliate provides them.” [Emphasis added.]
However, an attorney from the CFPB shared that minute 32 of the August 26, 2014 webinar addressed the question directly. The webinar can be heard by visiting the CFPB website: https://consumercomplianceoutlook.org/outlook-live/2014/FAQ-on-TILA-RESPA-Integrated- Disclosures-Rule/.
During the webinar, the presenter is asked the question about whether or not the Owner’s Title Insurance Premium is subject to any tolerance categories, then answered with a qualified “no” and went on to include that his answer also reflected the Rule’s direction “even if it is paid to an affiliate of the creditor.” The qualification in his answer included:
1) as long as the Owner’s Title Policy was not REQUIRED by the creditor;
2) as long as the fee is disclosed with the modifier “optional”; and
3) as long as the creditor acted in good faith when it disclosed the fee on the LE.
The above leads us to read 1026-19(e)(3)(iii) in the Rule:
"Good faith requirement for non-required services chosen by the consumer. Differences between amounts of estimated charges for services not required by the creditor disclosed pursuant to §1026.19(e)(1)(i) and the amounts of such charges paid or imposed on the consumer do not constitute lack of good faith, so long as the original estimated charge, or lack of an estimated charge for a particular service, was based on the best information reasonably available to the creditor at the time disclosure was provided."
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 17
SECTION 8: SELLER
If the combined Closing Disclosure (CD) form is chosen will the lender input the seller’s info?
Probably not, but each lender will have their own set of guidelines. It might make sense for you to consider using the bifurcated form (seller-only form) in your operation so that seller-only changes at the table may be completed by your shop once you have obtained lender approval. The Rule does say that a copy of the seller-only form must be provided to the lender after closing.
Is the lender in charge of the seller-side?
No, the Rule specifically states that the title/closing industry is responsible for the seller’s Closing Disclosure (CD).
What if the seller doesn’t want seller payoffs shown on the Closing Disclosure (CD)?
The solution is to bifurcate the form and issue a buyer-only closing sheet and a seller-only closing sheet. Otherwise, falsifying the combined CD is a serious problem today as well as under the new Rule.
Will lenders have input into the agent’s decision to use the bifurcated seller form?
Talk to your lenders now and tell them that it is your intention to bifurcate the form and use the form suggested by the CFPB for the seller. The Rule states that the lender must be provided a copy of the seller-only form after closing.
Where does the seller sign?
Since the regulations do not require any signatures on the Closing Disclosure (CD), it will be up to the lender and closing industry to determine if signature lines will be added authorizing the completion of the closing. Consider using the ALTA Settlement Statement to see if its use in addition to the CD will meet your needs. One of the purposes of the ALTA Settlement Sheet was to create a disbursement form containing signature lines that not only indicate the party’s approval of the numbers but authorize distribution.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 18
Seller’s-only closing statements:
As it relates to privacy policies, much of the information on the recommended form is what many would consider to be private/personal information. Is this form to be shared with both buyer and seller?
You are correct; a number of items on Closing Disclosure (CD) would be considered private borrower information and recognizing this, the CFPB created a Seller’s-Only Closing Disclosure. To see the form and other resources, go to ORT’s StarsLink, then Education & Marketing, then to CFPB Integrated Mortgage Disclosure Rule. Consider using the ALTA Settlement Statement which includes signature lines and many other solutions to the challenges created by the CD. Remember, the ALTA Settlement Statement is used in addition to the CD not in lieu of the CD
SECTION 9: SIMULTANEOUS ISSUE
How do you explain the problem with the disclosure of the title premium to customers?
Here is the required method to calculate and disclose the title premium.
– Loan Policy Premium: Show full loan policy premium without the simultaneous issue adjustment in Section B or C (whichever is applicable). This is as if the transaction were a refinance without the issuance of an owner’s policy.
– Owner’s Policy Premium: Shown in Section H and calculated by taking the full owner’s premium, plus the simultaneous issue fee, minus the amount shown for loan policy premium.
This works well if the buyer is paying the entire premium, though some state officials may object that the way the premium is required to be calculated on the disclosure is not the way the rates are filed or promulgated. Some state laws may require it disclosed differently, but if the seller is paying any portion and there is a simultaneous issue credit, the mandated formula will not work, thus rendering Page 2 of the Closing Disclosure (CD) inaccurate.
The solution – use the ALTA Settlement Statement in addition to the CD where you can accurately disclose the title premiums.
How do we fix the problem with the inaccurate disclosure of the title premiums?
Because the numbers must be adjusted to reflect accurate charges to the buyer and seller the CFPB suggested three ways to fix the problem.
The first solution may cause additional problems. The CFPB suggested "[t]he remaining credit could be applied to any other title insurance cost, including the lender's title insurance cost (See
§ 1026.38(f)&(g))" However, changing the lender's title insurance policy cost more likely will affect the APR and if the adjustment is significant enough it may cause a triggering of a new three-day review period.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 19
The second solution may also cause a problem. “The remaining credit can be considered to be a general seller credit and disclosed as such in the Summaries of Transactions table on page 3 of the Closing Disclosure. (See § 1026.38(k)(2)(vii))” A general seller credit may trigger a Qualified Mortgage (QM) disqualification which will remove the safe harbor protection for the lender. You and the lender will have to determine how the credit should be labeled in light of the QM Rule so as not to create a problem for the lender in the event this alternative is used.
Have the conversation now.
The third suggestion, if carefully worded may be the only workable solution. “Use of a credit specifying the remaining amount for the owner’s title insurance cost in the Summaries of Transactions table on page 3 of the Closing Disclosure. (See § 1026.38(k)(2)(viii)). This credit could be disclosed as a “simultaneous issue credit” in the Summaries of Transactions.” Determining which alternative will require a discussion with your lender.
Consider using the ALTA Settlement Statement in addition to the CD where you can accurately disclose the title premiums.
Why is Ohio on the list of states with challenges showing the correct title premium fees on the Closing Disclosure (CD)? In my area of Ohio, buyers pay all of the title premium fees.
Ohio and a number of other states have varying customs throughout the state. Northern Ohio is typically a buyer-pay area, Central Ohio is typically a seller-pay area and Southern Ohio is typically a hybrid. Northern Ohio will not have an issue with the form (unless the state objects to the way the fees are broken out on the form) because even though the fees are separated oddly, the total amount will be correct and thus the Cash to Close will be accurate. Central and Southern Ohio may be challenged.
The requirement of the CFPB in their TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure (TRID) for the calculation and disclosure of the title insurance premiums does not allow agents in many states to:
1) Conform to state laws, and
2) Display correct information to the consumer and seller in a buy-sell transaction.
As directed, disclosure of the title premium must be calculated as follows:
– Loan Policy Premium: Show full loan policy premium without simultaneous issue adjustment in B or C
– Owner’s Policy Premium: Use full owner’s premium, add simultaneous issue fee then subtract the amount shown for Loan Policy Premium. Show in Section H.
Doing so creates inaccuracy in states with simultaneous issue credits and where the seller pays any portion of the premiums.
In seller-pay states and/or simultaneous issue states, whether it is by custom, contract or regulation, this method of calculation shows the consumer paying too much and the seller
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 20
paying too little on Page 2 of the (CD). The easiest solution is to adjust the amounts as a debit/credit on Page 3; however, some lenders have expressed concern with this approach when it comes to meeting the Qualified Mortgage (QM) Rule. Current school of thought is as long as the descriptive phrase associated with the correction does not include “credit,” “debit,” or “adjustment,” we may be able to fix the form this way, but it is up to each individual lender to decide.
Even in states where the buyer pays all of the title premiums, we are being directed to show the fees in a way that may violate state filings or promulgation, thus causing a problem within a market conduct study or audit.
The industry has been diligently working for more than a year to encourage the CFPB to rewrite the section but it is not likely that changes will be made. On April 28, 2015, the American Land Title Association (ALTA) released the uniform ALTA Settlement Statement so that the numbers can be accurately reflected in an easy to understand format. The ALTA Settlement Statement can be used when explaining the numbers to the parties; however, the ALTA Settlement Statement will NOT be used in lieu of the CD. Rather, it will be used in addition to the CD. Please note the bottom line totals of the CD for the borrower and the seller must be exactly the same as the bottom line totals of the ALTA Settlement Statement.
SECTION 10: APR
Although lenders are the experts on what makes up the APR, this section will provide general background.
How much of a change to the APR is allowable without triggering a new three-day review period?
Depending on the type of loan it is either 1/4 or 1/8 of a percent. Some lenders have commented that will err on the side of caution and use the 1/8 of a percent change on all loans no matter what loan product is used in the transaction.
What type of changes would affect the APR?
In principle, the mortgage APR should include all settlement costs that would not arise in an all-cash transaction. Reg Z 226.4 defines many of the costs associated with the APR.
226.4 says, "It includes any charge payable directly or indirectly by the consumer AND imposed directly or indirectly by the creditor as an incident to or a condition of the extension of credit."
What we have learned from our many discussions with lenders is that each has their own unique interpretation on both the fees included in the calculation and their tolerance to change;
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 21
therefore, speaking with your lenders is vital to fully understand the APR issue. Any change made at closing should be approved by the lender.
Does a new three day review period get triggered if the APR becomes “inaccurate” (up or down) as is stated in the Rule or only if the APR “increases” as is stated a CFPB fact sheet?
Confusion has occurred over whether a new three-day review period is triggered if the APR decreases. We reached out to the CFPB and received a phone call from one of the staff attorneys who actually answered the phone. Of course the response was that the Rule (which states “inaccurate”) is actually correct when it references Regulation Z section 1026.22(a)(2). However, we were told to read further into 1026.22 to get to the heart of the issue. The attorney pointed me to three sections:
“1026.22 Determination of annual percentage rate. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 80112, Dec. 31, 2013.
(a) Accuracy of annual percentage rate.
(2) As a general rule, the annual percentage rate shall be considered accurate if it is not more than1/8 of 1 percentage point above or below the annual percentage rate determined in accordance with paragraph (a)(1) of this section.”
Notice the words “above or below.” However, we are then directed to 1026.22(a)(4) which further clarifies the accuracy of the APR if it is in conjunction with a mortgage on real property: “(4) Mortgage loans. If the annual percentage rate disclosed in a transaction secured by real property or a dwelling varies from the actual rate determined in accordance with paragraph (a)(1) of this section, in addition to the tolerances applicable under paragraphs (a)(2) and (3) of this section, the disclosed annual percentage rate shall also be considered accurate if:
(A) The disclosed finance charge would be considered accurate under§ 1026.18(d)(1); “
And then to determine accuracy for an APR connected with real property 1026.18(d)(1)(i) and
(ii) which state:
“(1) Mortgage loans. In a transaction secured by real property or a dwelling, the disclosed finance charge and other disclosures affected by the disclosed finance charge (including the amount financed and the annual percentage rate) shall be treated as accurate if the amount disclosed as the finance charge:
(i) Is understated by no more than $100; or (ii) Is greater than the amount required to be disclosed. “
Therefore, if the original quote is more than the final APR, it is deemed accurate. However, the CFPB attorney reminded us that if the APR is lower at the time of consummation it is deemed accurate only if the reduced APR is due to a reduction in interest rate or fees. If the math was wrong at the original quote and the creditor corrected it at the time of consummation, the creditor can not avail itself of the protection by simply saying, the APR decreased so I am compliant.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 22
SECTION 11: DAY OF CONSUMMATION
What about changes or adjustments requested by the real estate agent, buyer and seller for items discovered during the walk-through held the morning of consummation?
If the lender is inputting the numbers on the Closing Disclosure (CD) you will need to stop the transaction, call the lender, ask for the changes to be approved and made to the CD. You will then need to wait for the response and retransmission of the revised CD. Communication with the lender as soon as possible is key and knowing who at the lender will be available during your hour of closing/signing is vital.
If the lender allows you to input the numbers onto the CD then you can make the change at the table but still may need approval to continue from the lender (much like we do now). Critical in all of this is that no charges or adjustments may be made “off the sheet” and though the clients may be pushing you to look the other way, a falsified HUD-1 (now) and/or CD (later) is a criminal act.
Can the seller-side change at closing?
The answer to this question is it depends. It truly depends on why the seller side is changing. There is no seller-side only change that will retrigger the three-day waiting period UNLESS the change causes the buyer’s side to change in the three areas that trigger the new review period. But even if that is the case, certain seller changes may require approval of the buyer’s lender. Minor changes such as a water bill payment, (if it is a payment and not an adjustment) should not cause consummation problem, but the logistics of getting the CD revised may take some time. The sooner changes are communicated to the lender the better the likelihood that the transaction will proceed as scheduled. Many real estate professionals are considering conducting two walk-throughs, one seven days prior to consummation and the other one on the day of consummation.
If the lender is completing the Closing Disclosure (CD) on an FHA loan can I change the wording on the FHA certification to reflect that we did not complete theCD?
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) recently published new FAQs in its Single-Family Handbook. Question 374 addresses allowable changes settlement agents can make to the new settlement agent certification which replaces the current addendum to the HUD-1. FHA released its new certification earlier this summer, stating:
To the best of my knowledge, the Closing Disclosure which I have prepared is a true and accurate account of the funds which were (i) received, or (ii) paid outside closing, and the funds received have been or will be disbursed by the undersigned as part of the settlement of this transaction. I further certify that I have obtained the above certifications which were executed by the borrower(s) and seller(s) as indicated. (Emphasis added.)
As most lenders have decided to prepare the Closing Disclosure, the certification creates
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 23
possible instances in which settlement agents could be falsely signing the certification or delaying transactions for the FHA's low income and first-time homebuyers. In the FHA’s FAQ 374, it advises that settlement agents could simply delete or cross out the "which I have prepared" language in instances in which settlement agents did not prepare the Closing Disclosure. FHA’s FAQ 374 further states:
A: FHA does not wish for anyone to make a false certification. Because this is a model component, FHA will accept the tailoring of this phrase to the actual circumstances. Thus, if the Settlement Agent does not prepare the closing disclosure, he or she should remove or strike through the statement "which I have prepared" before executing the Settlement Certification. (Emphasis added.)
This is the FHA’s only guidance at this time; it has not revised the certification, nor clarified the instructions on the certification itself. Old Republic Title will continue to keep you updated on any further developments, as this will be part of any training for agents, closers, loan processors, and others involved.
Link to FHA FAQ Document: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/documents/huddoc?id=SFH_FAQ_Preview.pdf
SECTION 12: POST-CLOSING
Do changes made after closing on a refinance trigger a new three-day review period?
There are very specific requirements if changes are made after consummation as to notification and Closing Disclosure (CD) corrections but the retriggering of the review period only occurs if one of the three instances occurs. Please see the section on the three-day review period.
What are the procedures when something changes after closing?
If a fee to the consumer becomes inaccurate within 30 days of consummation and that inaccuracy results in a change to the amount actually paid by the consumer the Creditor must deliver or place in the mail a revised CD within 30 days of knowledge of the inaccuracy.
If a clerical non-numeric error is discovered the Creditor must deliver or place in the mail a revised CD within 60 days after consummation.
If a tolerance level is violated the Creditor must refund the required amount to the consumer within 60 days of consummation and the Creditor must provide a revised CD reflecting the refund within the same 60 day time period.
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 24
SECTION 13: INDUSTRY ISSUES
How will funding work under the newRule?
Most lenders have said they are still comfortable with the closing industry handling the funding and disbursement of funds. If the lender inputs the numbers onto the Closing Disclosure (CD), the title/closing offices will have to also input all of the numbers into their system so that they can balance and disburse.
Who will prepare the disclosure forms?
There are two new disclosure forms under the new Rule. The first is the Loan Estimate (LE) which replaces the GFE and the early Truth in Lending (TIL). The lenders or their designee (possibly the mortgage broker) will prepare and deliver the LE. The second disclosure form is the Closing Disclosure (CD), which replaces the HUD-1 and Final TIL. The Rule gives the lender the option of preparing the CD internally or working with a third party provider. Each lender will make their own decision as to whether or not they want to input the numbers internally or allow a third party provider to input or some hybrid of the two. Now is the time to communicate with your lenders to find out what role you can play. As you know, several large lenders have decided they will input the numbers onto the CD but have recognized the need to obtain many of the fees, calculations and adjustments from the title closing and escrowcompanies.
Will software providers leave the current HUD-1 on my system for use in cash and commercial transactions?
Please check with your software provider to make certain you will still have the use of the current HUD-1 as you will need something other than the Closing Disclosure (CD) for the exempt transactions.
The exempt transactions are:
HELOC, reverse mortgages, loans made by creditors making five or fewer loans per year (but they still have to deal with the Loan Officer Compensation Act), cash, commercial purpose loans, mobile home loans and no-interest second mortgage made for down payment assistance, and energy efficiency or foreclosure avoidance are all exempt.
Disbursements:
If the agents are not the ones preparing the Closing Disclosure (CD) is the agent still doing all the disbursing?
We are lead to believe that we will still be doing the disbursing in the proposed Rule but the recent CFPB consent orders and April 13, 2012 bulletin may cause lenders to consider taking the entire process in-house since they are responsible for the acts of third party providers. We have to make sure that our lenders understand that we are serious about following the rules and protecting the rights of the consumers, so that we continue performing this role. To-date,
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
September 9, 2015 Page 25
we are not aware of any lenders who have decided to take on this role. Please make certain your Best Practice procedures are in place and are well documented.
Do you think there will still be a role for a sole practitioner attorney/title agent under the new rules?
All small practitioners and agents should make their local lenders aware that they are ORT agents, that they understand the federal rules, that they have safeguards in place to protect the consumer’s information and that they are in the best position to serve the consumerwell.
One of the largest lenders in this country has told ORT that their number one priority is a positive customer experience. Hopefully they recognize that the expertise and the convenience of the local provider help assure a positive experience for their borrowers.
Additional TRID Questions? Email us at trid@oldrepublictitle.com
The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose. This information is not intended nor should it be construed as providing legal advice. Old Republic National Title Insurance Company does not guarantee, and assumes no responsibility for, the accuracy, timeliness, correctness, or completeness of the information. Always seek the advice of competent counsel with any questions you may have regarding any legal issue.
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Posted by Dana Bain on October 19th, 2015 8:23 PM

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